Republic Bank Limited Statement of Requirements, Design, Engineering, Construction Management

Republic Bank Limited

Port of Spain, Trinidad

Statement of Requirements, Design, Engineering, Construction Management

 

IBM/BRUNS-PAK were selected by Republic Bank Ltd. to develop a statement of requirements, architectural design and engineering, construction management consulting and commissioning services for a new data center and support infrastructure building to be developed on a Greenfield site outside Port of Spain, Trinidad. Upon completion the facility has become the new primary data center for the Bank.

The project scope included the infrastructure development of the undeveloped site; providing communications and utility services. The single story structure, which is approximately 26,000 square feet in area, is raised roughly five feet above the surrounding grade to enhance security and provide protection from flooding. The new facility provides the Bank with over 10,000 square feet of raised access floor space; including  approximately 5,000 square feet of “white space”, 2,500 square feet of future expansion “white space”, a Command Center, a War Room, a Staging area and other raise floor support functions. The structure, designed to withstand category ‘3’ hurricane winds, is a concrete frame with an insulated exterior metal wall panel system over concrete block exterior walls and covered by a ‘double roof’ system. The receiving area / loading dock supports both the IT technical functions and the mechanical / electrical infrastructure areas.

The mission critical facility incorporates a ‘2N’ segregated independent redundant electrical systems to provide concurrent maintainability in an “A/B” configuration, with the potential of a future “A/B/C” configuration. The mechanical system provides ‘N+1’ redundant configuration and utilizes a ‘hot aisle’ containment system in the Data Center. A ‘double interlock’ pre-action sprinkler system provides protection of the entire facility while a full flooding gaseous suppression system provides primary protection for the Data Centre and other critical areas. An Aspirating Smoke Detection (ASD) system provides for early detection in critical areas.

The project was completed and commissioned in the 4th quarter of 2017.

Check In From Data Center Solutions Team BRUNS-PAK

Good Morning! We wanted to check in as most people are enjoying the lazy days of Summer. We are enjoying ourselves, but our days are far from lazy! We have never been so excited for the future and the endeavors we are planning!

We are gearing up for September with plans to greatly improve our methods of connecting with new and existing clients. Some of you may have noticed our Chat feature via our Homepage, with BRUNS-PAK team members standing by to help you with any and all Data Center project needs/issues and concerns. You may also get a LinkedIn Inmail on behalf of our principal Mark Evanko, as we start to highlight some organizations that we’d like to introduce ourselves to. And if we have done business years ago, we want to re-introduce BRUNS-PAK and all of good things we are able to offer.

Please let us know via our new (and simple) Request for Information form if you have any questions or simply chat online with us and lets keep making things happen!

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Data Center Hybrid Solutions

If you were lucky enough to see Mark Evanko’s recent presentation at AFCOM Data Center World in Washington DC, you are likely fully aware that Cloud vs. Onsite discussions are put to rest with the idea of a Hybrid Solution as the only way to move ahead.

For Enterprises to success in their Data Center Space they must consider a multitude of elements which leads them to their own custom Hybrid Solution. We would like to link over to a version of Mark’s presentation from earlier this year. Please don’t hesitate to complete our RFI form to connect to BRUNS-PAKs team immediately!

What are the main reasons for adopting DCIM in your Data Center?

RECENT ENTERPRISE DATA CENTER SURVEY RESULTS

In a recent survey by BRUNS-PAK, more than one hundred (100) Enterprise Data Center CIO’s, Directors & Managers answered ten (10) industry dominating questions. Following are the results of that survey.

Q. What are the main reasons for adopting DCIM in your data center?
(multiple selections permitted)

112 Surveyed, and percent of responses listed below:

ASSET MANAGEMENT – 53%

POWER MANAGEMENT – 47%

CAPACITY MANAGEMENT – 46%

COOLING MANAGEMENT – 37%

REAL TIME ALARM MONITORING – 31%

LIFE CYCLE MANAGEMENT – 31%

CHANGE MANAGEMENT – 25%

CABLE MANAGEMENT – 21%

WORKFLOW PROCESSES – 19%

DO NOT HAVE A DCIM TOOL – 18%

2D / 3D FLOOR LAYOUT – 17%

CFD MODELING – 6%

WHATS DCIM? – 4%

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The World Is Changing. Is Your Data Center Strategy Keeping Up?

The World Is Changing. Is Your Data Center Strategy Keeping Up?
Big Data. Hybrid Cloud. Edge Computing. Just a few years ago these concepts were being explored in the ivory-tower conversations of academics and bleeding-edge startups. Today, each technology has become a foundational building block for IT strategies designed to address the accelerated pace and scale of global business.

Cloud computing has redefined the standards for cost-effectiveness, scalability and speed to market. Managed effectively, it can help IT departments ensure the enterprise achieves strategic value from the use of technology, regardless of where that technology resides and who owns it.

However, integrating cloud technology with an existing on-premise and hosted services architecture requires different strategies and management practices to address unique governance, risk, compliance, security and reliability challenges.

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About BRUNS-PAK

Data Center Services

Cloud integration strategy and planning is just one part of a portfolio of services we offer to help customers plan and implement data center facilities that are energy efficient, flexible, resilient, scalable and recoverable.

FIND OUT WHERE ENTERPRISE’S APPLICATIONS ARE CURRENTLY BEING HOSTED

2018 ENTERPRISE DATA CENTER SURVEY RESULTS

In a recent survey by BRUNS-PAK, more than one hundred (100) Enterprise Data Center CIO’s, Directors & Managers answered ten (10) industry dominating questions. Following are the results of that survey.

Q. What is the current ratio of applications hosted within the following?

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ENTERPRISE – 65%

COLOCATION – 15%

CLOUD – 20%

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Regarding your data center investments strategy, which structure is more favorable, CAPEX or OPEX?

2018 ENTERPRISE DATA CENTER SURVEY RESULTS

In a recent survey by BRUNS-PAK, more than one hundred (100) Enterprise Data Center CIO’s, Directors & Managers answered ten (10) industry dominating questions. Following are the results of that survey.

Q. Regarding your data center investments strategy, which structure is more favorable, CAPEX or OPEX?

34% Said OPEX

33% Said CAPEX

33% Said Ask the CFO

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Data Center Survey Results…On which assests do you have life cycle replacement / maintenance program with MOP’s?

2018 ENTERPRISE DATA CENTER SURVEY RESULTS

In a recent survey by BRUNS-PAK, more than one hundred (100) Enterprise Data Center CIO’s, Directors & Managers answered ten (10) industry dominating questions. Following are the results of that survey.

Q. On which assets do you have life cycle replacement/ maintenance program with MOP’s? (multiple selections permitted)

N-112 – Percentages of those individuals surveyed said….

FACILITY INFRASTRUCTURE – 73%

DISASTER RECOVERY – 46%

ENERGY EFFICIENCY – 45%

CYBERSECURITY – 42%

NETWORK / CONNECTIVITY – 41%

MODULARITY / SCALABILITY / RELIABILITY – 40%

CLOUD INTERNAL / EXTERNAL – 37%

REGULATORY COMPLIANCE – 25%

SERVICE LEVEL AGREEMENTS – 24%

PERSONNEL – 23%

COMPUTER HARDWARE – 19%

COLOCATION – 17%

MIGRATION/RELOCATION – 17%

INDUSTRY BEST PRACTICES – 14%

CAPEX VS. LEASE / OPEX – 14%

COMPUTER SOFTWARE / APPS – 13%

LEGAL REPERCUSSIONS – 0

MODULAR DATA CENTER – 0

How concerned is your enterprise and Data Center regarding cyber attacks & the impact on your brand?

In a recent survey by BRUNS-PAK, more than one hundred (100) Enterprise Data Center CIO’s, Directors & Managers answered ten (10) industry dominating questions. Following are the results of that survey.

Q. How concerned is your enterprise regarding cyber attacks & the impact on your brand?

MORE THAN 75% OF RESPONDANTS SAY THEIR ENTERPRISE IS VERY CONCERNED – See breakdown below:

Level of Concern – 108 Data Center subjects

1-3 people said very low or less concern

1-4 people had low concern

1- 10 people had Medium concern or less

22 people had high concern

76 people had Very High concern

Data Center Survey Results, What is your organization’s plan to leverage Edge Computing?

RECENT ENTERPRISE DATA CENTER SURVEY RESULTS

In a recent survey by BRUNS-PAK, more than one hundred (100) Enterprise Data Center CIO’s, Directors & Managers answered ten (10) industry dominating questions. Following are the results of that survey.

Q. What is your organization’s plan to leverage edge computing?

(number of surveyed individuals – 110)

CLOUD – 39%

WHAT’S EDGE COMPUTING? – 23%

MICRO DATA CENTERS (I.E. IDF/MDF ROOMS) – 20%

MODULAR DATA CENTERS – 7%

COLOCATION – 11%

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Data Center Survey results: AVERAGE RATIO OF WHERE ENTERPRISE’S APPLICATIONS ARE FORECASTED TO BE HOSTED IN 5 YEARS

2018 ENTERPRISE DATA CENTER SURVEY RESULTS

Who do you trust with your Mission Critical Projects? BRUNS-PAK has 38 years, 6,000 Projects and is 100% Data Center focused.

In a recent survey by BRUNS-PAK, more than one hundred (100) Enterprise Data Center CIO’s, Directors & Managers answered ten (10) industry dominating questions. Following are the results of that survey

Q. What is the 5 year forecasted ratio of applications hosted within the following?

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Enterprise – 48%

Colocation – 15%

Cloud – 37%

Survey forecast ratio

Understanding Data Center Enterprise Transformation

Mark Evanko, co-founder of BRUNS-PAK, will moderate a panel on data center enterprise transformation at Data Center World Local, Washington D.C.

 by Danny Bradbury, Data Center Knowledge, April 10th 2018
Here is the text from the article below, great read!

When you want to know what trends should be on your radar as a data center professional, Mark Evanko is a good source of knowledge. With nearly four decades of experience in the data center space, the co-founder and principal engineer at data center consulting firm BRUNS-PAK understands where today’s trends came from – and where they’re going.

He has his ear close to the ground, getting feedback directly from BRUNS-PAK’s target market. He hears what issues are top of mind for board executives and senior management when planning their data center developments and uses this to help maintain a multi-point strategic planning model.

In the past, that model has featured 18 elements that impact enterprise data center solutions. They have included cloud computing, colocation and disaster recovery.

Evanko will be moderating a panel about trends in the data center space at Data Center World Local, Washington D.C. on May 15. Attendees at this Data Center Enterprise Transformation presentation will learn the “elements” and fundamental concepts associated with the continued transformation. The panel will also explain what board of directors, senior management, stock holders, trustees, and taxpayers are looking for in their data center solution and provide a vendor-neutral overview of total cost of ownership vs. risk.

Security and the Cloud

One of the most significant factors associated with data center transformation is cybersecurity, especially as it pertains to cloud computing, Evanko warns.

“If data is ever taken, stolen or corrupted at a third-party venue, there is no recovery for the enterprise. They can’t sue the third-party provider because they absolve themselves of any liability,” he says. He adds that large third-party cloud and colocation service providers will generally not take liability for security breaches in client contracts because it would be prohibitively expensive for them.

“Some of these large enterprises are weighing that risk,” he explains. This manifests itself in decisions about which applications to take off-site and which to retain on a company’s premises. He has a process called ‘candidacy’, in which BRUNS-PAK reviews products and services against several tiers of mission-criticality. The cloud has a role in less critical applications, he says.

Evanko warns that there is still much educating to be done as companies struggle to keep track of a rapidly-changing data center landscape. “Many of the customers that we have come across have not necessarily understood what the impacts are,” he says.

Therein lies his fundamental message. When it comes to managing transformational data center trends like edge and cloud computing while keeping your information safe, data center professionals must understand how to balance risk, total cost of ownership, and functionality.

That can be a difficult path to walk, which is why understanding the impacts of these new technologies is so critical

The New Normal in Data Center Infrastructure Strategy

IT/Line of Business IT SpendingCloud computing is a top-of-mind initiative for organizations in all industries. The promise of scalable, on-demand infrastructure, consumption-based pricing that reduces capex demands, and faster time-to-market for new solutions constitutes an intoxicating potion for requirements-challenged, cash-strapped IT executives.

However, for many IT executives, the migration to the cloud is not a simple decision for one big reason security. When you own and manage your own infrastructure or employ traditional colo or managed hosting services, there are established policies, practices and risk mitigation strategies that are widely accepted. In the murky waters of the cloud, entirely new risks emerge, including:

  • Less transparency on infrastructure security practices, especially in below-the-hypervisor assets
  • New multi-tenancy considerations that are not as well documented or understood
  • Greater delegation of governance, risk and compliance demands to the cloud services provider

Despite these considerations, the financial lure of the cloud is inescapable. Public cloud services providers (CSPs) like Amazon and Microsoft have created massive economies of scale and are increasingly focused on segmented private cloud services that set a new normal in terms of cost-effectiveness, scalability and the ability to deliver truly agile IT infrastructure.

This has forced many IT departments to begin to look at workload segmentation in a new light. Beyond the questions of transactional vs. archival or batch vs. real-time workloads, organizations now need to look at applications that are “cloud adaptable”, both in terms of performance/technical readiness and in terms of governance, risk and compliance. New, business-driven applications like social CRM, human capital management, collaborative procurement and predictive analytics are all strong candidates for migration to on-demand cloud architecture.

This leads to another ‘new normal’ in IT infrastructure hybrid architectures. Hybrid IT infrastructure bridges public and private clouds, managed services providers and on-premise data centers. This composite fabric needs to be secured and managed for optimized performance, compliance and risk, opening up entirely new challenges and ushering in whole new classes of automation and management toolkits, such as internal cloud services brokers. It also forces greater emphasis on internal plans for virtualization or on-premise cloud deployments that can be integrated seamlessly in these complex architectures.

Making sense of this trend and its associated technologies can be confusing. BRUNS-PAK Consulting Services is a growing part of BRUNS-PAK’s comprehensive data center services offerings. Our consulting services team is expert at helping customers to plan and implement complex strategies for alternative infrastructures and dynamic IT deployment. By helping IT management understand and optimize the following critical infrastructure considerations, we can make it easier to align IT strategy with business needs, and reduce the rise of shadow IT initiatives:

  • Value of current facilities renovation/expansion (CAPEX vs. OPEX)
  • New data center build options (CAPEX)
  • Alternative financing options/leaseback (OPEX)
  • Co-location design and optimization
  • Cloud integration
  • Containers/Pods
  • Network/WiFi design and management
  • Migration/relocation options
  • Hybrid computing environment design and deployment

To learn more about how BRUNS-PAK Consulting Services can help you address emerging challenges in your data center strategy, contact Jackie Porr at 732-248-4455, or via e-mail at jporr@bruns-pak.com or by using the Information Request Form linked below.

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High Impact Measures to Boost Data Center Efficiency (Part 3)

Energy efficiency in electrical systems can be achieved through some measures to limit losses through devices among these components. Power parity (the amount of power put into a device equaling the amount of power provided to the device) provides for the most efficient use of power. Transformers and equipment which utilize transformers (such as UPS systems and PDU’s) tend to have some losses in efficiency due to the friction losses in the windings of these transformers. As equipment vendors apply more stringent manufacturing techniques to their products, improvements can be made to efficiencies of this type of equipment. UPS vendors now provide UPS systems which operate at a .95 or higher power factor. This means that there is only a 5% loss of power into the device
compared to power supplied by the device. It should be noted that these power factors are generally based on a load limit on the device no lower than around 30% of the rated maximum for the device, although some of the newer UPS systems can maintain their power factor down to as low as 20% of the rated maximum. As equipment is replaced due to changes in a system, end of life, or equipment failure, higher efficiency equipment should be specified and provided to improve on energy efficiency for these systems.

Measurement and Recording Data

We mentioned in part 1 of this series that in order to understand the consumption of power related to the data center, metering of these systems needs to be provided. Further, trending of this information is invaluable to understanding a baseline of energy use as well as the outcome of changes implemented to improve efficiency. The Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) of the systems is an indicator of how efficient the data center operates. It is very important to understand where your data center ranks for PUE in order to know what measures should be taken to improve efficiency. This means that recording power usage at the main switchgear supporting both the electrical and mechanical equipment supplying the data center, and at the distribution side of the UPS systems distribution
(preferably at the 120/208 volt level at the PDU’s) is ideal to achieve the simplest means of calculating the PUE.

Lighting

Lighting systems have been moving towards more energy efficient components in recent years.  These systems have moved away from the use of incandescent and T12 luminaires to compact fluorescent and LED fixtures. ENERGY STAR has reported savings of 42% by switching from T12 fluorescent luminaires with magnetic ballasts to high efficiency T8 luminaires with electronic ballasts. It should be noted that oftentimes these higher efficiency luminaires actually produce higher lighting levels in addition to using less power. The more recent introduction of LED lighting luminaires, which can be retrofit into current fluorescent fixtures, is driving these efficiencies even higher.

Lighting Controls

Another energy savings measure which can be implemented in the data center is lighting controls. The notion of “lights out” data center operations refers to personnel not being normally stationed in the data center space. As operational controls of data processing applications become more network driven, and remotely accessed, less time is required in the data center to perform these activities. As a result of this reduced time spent in the data center, lighting becomes less necessary to operate under non-manned periods. Lighting controls utilizing occupancy sensors as a means of controlling lighting offers a reasonable solution to taking control of shutting off the lights out of the personnel entering and using the space. However, occupancy sensors do not allow for continued presence in the space when personnel are out of sensory contact with a motion or occupancy sensor due to working within or at the lower portions of equipment racks. In order to better accommodate these specialized circumstances in the data center, a combination of occupancy/motion sensors in conjunction with card access systems allows for a highly effective and efficient lighting controls strategy.

The Bottom Line

Once the proper metering components are in place and baselines are established, it’s relatively simple to determine which electrical infrastructure equipment will benefit from an upgrade and what the payback for the investment will be.  Also, paying attention to lighting controls can improve energy efficiency in the data center.  No matter what the situation is in your data center, a facility-wide energy audit from an experienced partner will help to identify the areas where the most immediate impact can be achieved.